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Can I Replace Xenon Bulbs Myself

author
Daniel Brown
• Monday, 14 December, 2020
• 12 min read

Some new car models today use a xenon headlight, known for their high-end quality and technology. Xenon bulbs are brighter and last much longer, compared to the other bulbs available in the market today.

(Source: www.ebay.com)

Contents

With a little knowledge and certain tips, you will have a fairly easy job replacing them. If you have a voltmeter or a testing screwdriver, you can attach it on the wires connecting the xenon headlights and check if everything works properly.

Remove it, turning it counterclockwise until you hear a slight click. Once firmly locked, reconnect the harness with the wires and then use the screws you unfastened earlier to re-mount the Xenon headlights back in place.

If you are familiar with the task, you can buy the wires and replace them on your own, following the existing connection pattern. Make sure that all wires and bulbs are firmly locked in place so that there is no blinking of the lights when you turn the engine on.

They're a really expensive pain, these xenon lights: I'm on my third offside headlamp and at £800 a go it's a bit of a bore. Yes, that's what I was kind of figuring...and yet one can freely buy HID upgrade kits on the 'net for all manner of other cars to retrofit.

The upgrade kits cover a wide range of different things, starting from ordinary bulbs with a bluish tinge or filled with xenon gas, going through to OEM or aftermarket light units with control units, igniters and different bulbs mounted in a bespoke glass with proper level controls. I have no doubt that you can change the bulb yourself if equipped with the correct tools and a modicum of intelligence.

xenon bulb change
(Source: www.youtube.com)

I've worked in accident repair for 7.5 years and its no different from changing a normal bulb, just don't touch or get the glass dirty, Some, I cant remember which ones are gas filled headlights and you won't be able to do them your self Make sure the lights are off, don't touch the sense of the bulb at all & with an ounce of common sense you could do it yourself.

Learn how to change the Mercedes HID Xenon headlight bulb yourself. This guide applies to 2005 and newer Mercedes models, including E, C, S, CLS, G, GL, ML, R Class.

How do you know if the Xenon bulb is the reason your Mercedes headlight is out? Typically, a Xenon HID bulb will get dimmer, and the light color may change to pink near the end of its life.

Second, the light color will not match your stock headlight bulb. Wait a few minutes before removing your Mercedes HID bulb.

The HID bulbs have a couple of channels that need to line up properly in the headlight assembly. One way to check is to swap the ballast from passenger to driver side.

lamps headlight
(Source: www.vwt4forum.co.uk)

I replaced the Xenon bulb on my Mercedes, but the light is still not working. Faulty HID Ballast Bad Igniter when applicable Blown headlight fuse.

Corroded headlight terminal Defective SAM Module Loose connection Once the bulb itself fails, it will not come back to life randomly.

Mercedes HID headlight flickers or flashes; why? At the end of its life, an HID bulb may flicker, change color and appear weak.

Generally, if flickering is happening with OEM equipment, then the problem is the ballast or the igniter. In day running light mode, less power is delivered to the headlight.

At the risk of a little hypocrisy I'll ask this question:One of my car's Xenon lightbulbs gave out yesterday. After learning how much my dealer charges to replace them ($60-$80 for work, and it's supposed to take 1.5h), I'm getting this urge to try myself.

xenon bulb difference tell vs mbworld
(Source: mbworld.org)

On the other hand, there are many stories around the Internet from people who have changed their bulbs without a problem. The technology description also says that the high voltage is only required to start the lamp.

Re: Is it dangerous to change xenon bulbs in my car's headlights? It wasn't hard, the hardest part was getting head piece out, I had to pull harder than I thought.

It wasn't hard, the hardest part was getting head piece out, I had to pull harder than I thought. But it was a normal bulb and not xenon ... does it matter?for the high voltage part, just disconnecting the battery to car would take care of the problem I think.

Re: Is it dangerous to change xenon bulbs in my car's headlights? Disconnect the battery, and then when you have the headlight assembly out, short across the terminals or exposed wire to discharge any stored energy from a start capacitor.

But since it's only 12V, I can hold both ends in my hands all day long without feeling a thing. If the bulb is off to begin with, and it doesn't waste my battery, that means that there is no current flowing through it.

But since it's only 12V, I can hold both ends in my hands all day long without feeling a thing. That 12 volts is plenty to send out hundreds of amps to your starter when asked.

The reason it's ok is that your body resistance is sufficiently high enough to keep the current really low. That's a fundamental. Here's a prove-it situation: take a small 9v battery, and touch the terminals across the back of your hand.

In either case, don't touch the bulb with bare fingers, the oils of your skin will cause a hot spot on the bulb that will shorten its life, possibly to a few moments. And in either case, unplug the wires to the bulb/lens assembly before removing the bulb.

In the case of the HID system, the ballast in usually separate from the lens, and this is where the capacitor would be. There is likely a capacitor in the ballast which will store a charge, but unless the headlight is turned on it remains disconnected from the bulb.

This can happen quite easily if you have another person around helping or watching, or even if you have a car alarm that you could accidentally trigger. You can get the cloth coated in rubber kind from Dollar Tree.

If you are really worried disconnect the battery the night before, capacitors are not meant to hold their charge for a really long time so would be discharged after a few minutes likely as not. That is so not true... Halogen is like your regular bulb, with a piece of wolfram where the current flows through.

Xenon is more like a neon tube with an arc that has to be ignited with thousands of volts. The Leon headlight has a starter which provides the spark for the initial arc. The 80 KV are only around for a short time. But has there been capacitors involved which might hold the voltage for a period of time.

I've not seen a headlight where the bulb changes the position of the bucket... but if it does:Drive up to a brick wall. There was a time many years ago that state inspections included a “check headlight adjustment”.

It was basically a way for the inspectors to fail you and charge you an extra $10 for the adjustment. That is so not true... Halogen is like your regular bulb, with a piece of wolfram where the current flows through.

Xenon is more like a neon tube with an arc that has to be ignited with thousands of volts. To make things even more complicated, there *are* xenon bulbs that are essentially like halogens--tungsten filament and all.

For a while they were sold as plug-and-play upgrades for car headlamps--basically the next step up from a halogen. And then there are * xenon arc* bulbs which require a ballast and different reflector positioning.

Nowadays most people mean xenon arc” when they say xenon in the context of car headlights, but a few years ago before His were prevalent xenon often just meant a brighter, longer lasting version of the halogen bulb. That is something you can not properly do yourself, but it should take a mechanic like 5 minutes and cost 10 bucks. I've not seen a headlight where the bulb changes the position of the bucket... but if it does: It's less a matter of the bulb and more that I have to disassemble half of the car to get them out in the first place.

To make things even more complicated, there *are* xenon bulbs that are essentially like halogens--tungsten filament and all. For a while they were sold as plug-and-play upgrades for car headlamps--basically the next step up from a halogen.

It's less a matter of the bulb and more that I have to disassemble half of the car to get them out in the first place. It is this sort of thing that makes you want to hit the automotive engineer responsible with a baseball bat.

Capacitors are not meant to hold their charge for a really long time so would be discharged after a few minutes likely as not. Capacitors, depending on the type, can hold charge nearly indefinitely. People have been killed digging around junkyards, stumbling on old tube TVs (which had been sitting in the junkyard for years or decades), and touching the internal capacitors.

Parallel plate caps at 400V will ruin your day, and they can do it today, or they can do it ten years from now. Therefore, there are often bleed-off resistors across the capacitor terminals that allow it to slowly discharge, over a period of whatever timeframe makes sense.

It's less a matter of the bulb and more that I have to disassemble half of the car to get them out in the first place. It is this sort of thing that makes you want to hit the automotive engineer responsible with a baseball bat. Too true, but make sure you really need to disassemble everything. My 2002 VW supposedly took an hour to do it.

Capacitors are not meant to hold their charge for a really long time so would be discharged after a few minutes likely as not. This is such bullshit. Capacitors, depending on the type, can hold charge nearly indefinitely. People have been killed digging around junkyards, stumbling on old tube TVs (which had been sitting in the junkyard for years or decades), and touching the internal capacitors.

Parallel plate caps at 400V will ruin your day, and they can do it today, or they can do it ten years from now. Therefore, there are often bleed-off resistors across the capacitor terminals that allow it to slowly discharge, over a period of whatever timeframe makes sense.

You can get the cloth coated in rubber kind from Dollar Tree. If you are really worried disconnect the battery the night before, capacitors are not meant to hold their charge for a really long time so would be discharged after a few minutes likely as not.

What do you think wearing rubber gloves from dollar tree is doing to protect you? Quote from: fodder69 on December 12, 2013, 07:10:10 am capacitors are not meant to hold their charge for a really long time so would be discharged after a few minutes likely as not. This is such bullshit.

Capacitors, depending on the type, can hold charge nearly indefinitely. You are definitely correct there, but they are not *meant* to hold said charge and capacitors meant for this use will almost certainly have a resistor either internal or external to drain the charge after a period of time.

Well, for me, it mainly protects my fingers from all the nicks and cuts I managed to acquire every time I work on a car.

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2 www.tripadvisor.com - https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g274725-d1209827-Reviews-Oliwa_Zoo-Gdansk_Pomerania_Province_Northern_Poland.html
3 www.rome2rio.com - https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Gda%C5%84sk/Oliwa-ZOO-01
4 moovitapp.com - https://moovitapp.com/index/pl/transport_publiczny-Oliwa_Zoo-Tricity-site_17502526-4755
5 www.inyourpocket.com - https://www.inyourpocket.com/gdansk/gdansk-zoo_21212v
6 moovitapp.com - https://moovitapp.com/index/pl/transport_publiczny-Park_Oliwski-Tricity-site_17498753-4755