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Can A Zombie Apocalypse Happen In 2021

author
James Smith
• Saturday, 07 November, 2020
• 7 min read

However, it's important to note that his prophecies are in poetry form, and are often times vague. He's said to have predicted King Henry II's death, the rise of Hitler, JFK's assassination, and a few others.

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The lines allegedly about Hitler are especially chilling: “From the depths of the West of Europe / A young child will be born of poor people” who “by his tongue… seduce a great troop.” Again, though, Nostradamus's wording is always vague and can pretty much be applied to a lot of catastrophic historical events.

He apparently also wrote, “Fathers and mothers dead of infinite sorrows / Women in mourning, the pestilent shemonster: / The Great One to be no more, all the world to end.” He also allegedly threw in a famine and a couple of asteroids smashing into earth.

Some believe he predicted COVID-19 when he wrote, “There will be a twin year from which will arise a queen who will come from the east and who will spread a plague in the darkness of night, on a country with 7 hills and will transform the twilight of men into dust, to destroy and ruin the world. Plus, experts aren't exactly alarmed by Nostradamus's apocalyptic prophecies anyway, especially with the mention of plagues.

The past year has been a tumultuous one for the whole world which started with bushfires across Australia, a global pandemic and international protests about the Black Lives movement. In a world where we can ’t make plans right now, some social media users have been reading about wild predictions about 2021 and a supposed ‘ zombie apocalypse ’.

The Mayans predicted that the world would end on June 21st, 2012 (later changed to December 21st, 2012) which didn’t happen. But historians and experts have warned that some of Nostradamus’ apocalyptic predictions such as plagues were very common during his time.

A lot of social media users have taken to Twitter to share their reactions to the apocalyptic theories going on the internet. In the past couple of years, the world was predicted to end in a nuclear war, an asteroid impact, and a new ice age, to name just a few of the more popular doomsday prophecies.

The zombie apocalypse : An army of undead monsters terrorizing unsuspecting citizens, feeding on human brains, and slowly but surely taking over the world? What sounds like the cheapest possible horror movie cliché has developed quite a following in the apocalypse community.

While some listed events had tragic consequences for many involved, a look at the track record of prophets and prophecies is a good reminder that there is no need to panic. American radio host Harold Camping had arrived at the date for the apocalypse through a series of calculations that he claimed were based on Jewish feast days and the lunar calendar.

In addition to his claims about the end of the world, he also predicted that on May 21, 2011, at precisely 6:00 p.m., God's elect people would be assumed into heaven, in an event he called the Rapture. According to media reports, some of his followers quit their jobs, sold their homes, and invested large amounts of money in publicizing Camping's predictions.

Scientists use the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland, to set up controlled collisions of particles at very high speeds. The experiments have caused some to believe that the energies set free by the collisions will form a black hole powerful enough to consume Earth and all life on it.

This prediction was based on the practice followed by computer programmers of abbreviating year numbers with two digits when developing software. For instance, “1999” would be coded as “99.” At the turn of the century, computers would revert to “00,” assuming that the date was 1900 instead of 2000 and leading to software errors.

Austrian geologist and Nostradamus buff Alexander Tillman decided to play it safe by sitting it out in a self-built bunker in Austria. Marion Beech) claimed to have received a message from planet Clarion in the early 1950s: the world was to end in a great flood before dawn on December 21, 1954.

Martin and a group of followers is convinced that a flying saucer would rescue the true believers before the inevitable destruction of Earth. The belief was so strong that some broke completely with their previous lives, quitting their jobs, leaving their spouses, and giving away money and possessions.

Their work, When Prophecy Fails, delivers the first instance of Festinger's noted theory of cognitive dissonance. Most of us believe that the idea of zombies should be confined to the horror section of our preferred movie providers.

In them, he discovered details of a genuine US military plan to combat a zombie outbreak. Peter Cummings, a scientist from Boston University, states that several diseases and conditions already exist that could cause someone to be viewed as a zombie.

According to Cummings, the key to understanding the potential for these conditions to produce zombie traits was to examine the shutdown of the frontal lobe of the brain. He claimed that this resets the mind to its primal survival instincts, which is a zombielike state.

However, any “stimulation” from another person during this time made these patients “go berserk.” For what it’s worth, Cummings works in an advisory capacity for the Zombie Research Society, “an organization dedicated to the historic, cultural, and scientific study of the living dead.” When thinking of zombies, most people conjure up images of the dead rising from their graves.

She stated that the rising dead was an unlikely scenario, but the mutation of a virus similar to rabies wasn’t. Furthermore, she warned that this mutated strain could spread around the world and cause a condition almost identical to the typical view of a zombie.

For example, what if an individual or a group of people take it upon themselves to create a mutation of such a virus for the so-called “greater good” of the planet? With the slave trade, these traditions and practices made the journey to many parts of the Americas.

In recent times, Haiti has become one of the epicenters of modern cases of “zombies.” In fact, the notion of voodoo permeates the mindset of the population. Without a doubt, one of the most controversial claims of real-life zombies came from Wade Davis of Harvard University.

Even more intriguing was Davis’s claims that criminals were turned into zombies in antiquity to stop their wayward behavior. Ultimately, he stated that creating zombies was achieved through a mixture of secret natural toxins.

Other believed that such discoveries, if true, would be of great interest to secret military projects. Researcher Zora Neal Huston has performed some of the most exhaustive studies of zombies in Haiti.

Almost half a century before Davis, Huston claimed that “people have been called back from the dead.” Supposedly, she had also witnessed real “zombies in Haiti.” In one intriguing account, Huston tells of being invited to study hoodoo rituals up close.

A hoodoo priest gave permission for the unique opportunity, and Huston eventually performed several rituals herself. However, the account in her 1938 book, Tell My Horse: Voodoo and Life in Haiti and Jamaica, really grabbed people’s attention.

‘ Zombie Parasite Takes Over Insects Through Mind Control | National Geographic The main worry is that these natural methods will be replicated in a science lab and used against the general population.

For example, many natural zombies are created when a parasite enters the nervous system of an animal through the food chain. This is most often an effort to bring the animal out into the open and in full view of its natural predators.

Stephen Kane, an associate professor at the University of California, Riverside, certainly has a unique theory as to why aliens have not visited Earth. In 2014, he claimed that space travel in the past had left such astronauts stranded as zombies on an unknown planet.

When we view the idea of zombies in those terms, the prospect doesn’t appear so laughable regardless of how unlikely it is to happen. Some researchers insist that the intelligence world is seeking to turn people into zombies through the use of drugs and mind control.

It is one of the greatest fears of humanity, inspired by a bulk of Hollywood movies, and scientists do believe that a zombie outbreak could happen. While it would be impossible to believe that the dead would rise and feed on the living, experts do think that a parasite could affect the brain or a virus could evolve.

Wendy Ingham, who was involved in the study, says that the team tested the parasite on mice which were ultimately unfazed by the presence of a predator once infected. Rabies has a modification effect on animals (Image: GETTY)She warned that toxoplasma is dangerous: “The idea that this parasite knows more about our brains than we do, and has the ability to exert desired change in complicated rodent behavior, is absolutely fascinating.

“Toxoplasma has done a phenomenal job of figuring out mammalian brains in order to enhance its transmission through a complicated life cycle.” A zombie outbreak IS possible (Image: GETTY)Dr. Ben Newman, a professor of virology at the University of Reading, believes that a virus such as rabies could evolve and conquer humanity.

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Sources
1 www.facebook.com - https://www.facebook.com/GrupaHatak/posts/4144807562215847
2 en.wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WandaVision