logo
Archive

Best Waco Documentary Netflix

author
Maria Johnson
• Wednesday, 16 December, 2020
• 7 min read

If you'd like to more about the story about disagreements over religious freedom, the boundaries of the federal government, and what it means to be a legitimate religion, there are plenty of documentaries that break down the events that came to a head in 1993 on a ranch in Waco, TX. ParamountWhile most of the shows in Netflix’s daily top 10 list are its own originals, sometimes something slips through.

viii secrets palace popsugar henry
(Source: www.popsugar.com)

Contents

Waco has held onto its top 10 spot on Netflix since its debut, right now sneaking it at number 10 itself, and I watched the entire thing in one sitting a day ago and can report back that yes, it’s absolutely worth your time. Netflix Waco is a “both sides” look at the story, based on two different books, one by a surviving member of the cult, the other by an FBI hostage negotiator who was there.

And while Forest clearly did some gross things like marrying a 14-year-old and fathering a child with her, the main thrust of the story is that of the overreaction by the US government that escalated the situation and got everyone inside killed. It’s led by Taylor Kitsch as David Forest, who charmed us as Tim Higgins all those years ago on Friday Night Lights, but couldn’t live down his turn as John Carter as Hollywood tried and failed to turn him into a blockbuster draw.

Probably the best aspect of the roster is the Boardwalk Empire trio of Michael Shannon, Shea Whig ham and Paul Sparks playing an FBI negotiator, an FBI unit commander and David’s right hand respectively. The odd man out may be a surprisingly large role for Rory Colin as one of the few survivors of the fire.

ParamountThis is a haunting, horrifying, sometimes surreal show, as I imagine it was to live through 50 days of this back in the ‘90s when it was all over TV. Waco is sympathetic to most of the members of the cult, other than perhaps David himself, who, despite the government’s overreaction, probably could have saved everyone’s lives were he not so wrapped up in his own mythology.

If you’ve been watching Waco, Paramount Network’s riveting miniseries about the historic siege that left dozens dead, you may wonder what really went on behind the scenes and what information we’re not getting. The story of the 1993 standoff, David Forest, and the FBI and ATF officials boasts so many layers that it’s almost impossible to keep track of all of them, but lucky for us, there have been a ton of documentaries, films, and specials created about the events referenced on the show.

henry viii palace secrets netflix hampton court popsugar documentaries royals
(Source: www.popsugar.com)

We rounded up a few of the best titles out there that explore what was happening at Mount Carmel before and during the siege, events like Ruby Ridge that contributed to the violent consequences of Waco, and the making of David Forest. Timed perfectly with the release of Waco on Paramount, this A&E two-part special takes a deep dive into the magnetic charisma of David Forest, using previously unseen FBI negotiation tapes and archival footage, and the testimony of nine Branch Dravidians.

While the drama, starring Taylor Kitsch, Michael Shannon, and John Leguizamo, might seem like creative fiction, it’s a true and terrible saga. It’s a story about disagreements over religious freedom, the boundaries of the federal government, and what it means to be a legitimate religion that came to a head in 1993 on a ranch in Waco, TX.

The Branch Dravidians, an offshoot of Seventh Day Adventists, were born of a movement started by a man named Victor House. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) first approached the compound in 1993, after being tipped off about a package of grenade casings en route to the facility had accidentally broken open.

It was the longest gun battle in U.S. law enforcement history and only ended because federal agents started running out of ammunition. The botched raid led to a 51-day standoff managed by the FBI that cost a million dollars a week, and escalated to combat vehicles attacking the compound on April 19, 1993, and punching holes in the buildings to deploy tear gas and force the Branch Dravidians out.

You are free to attack a person or groups ideas, but you are crossing the line when calling for violence. This will be heavily enforced in threads with breaking news involving victims.

days end episode cast
(Source: www.radiotimes.com)

Not even sure what to say about the FBI and the ATF's part in this, they did make it seem as though Janet Reno and Clinton weren't culpable....not sure I'm buying that. No idea how much proof of that exists, but the fact that the series set out to make a grounded antihero out of a child marrying polygamist zealot who used religion to gain sexual access to women and live out a god complex is pretty gross.

I don't know if the smoke grenades caused a fire (doesn't exactly sound unlikely), but the ATF had flamethrowers on APC's just nailing the building. No idea how much proof of that exists, but the fact that the series set out to make a grounded antihero out of a child marrying polygamist zealot who used religion to gain sexual access to women and live out a god complex is pretty gross.

Forest was an absolute megalomaniac at heart, and a vicious piece of trash. On the other end, the government, specifically the FBI and ATF, prosecuted their raid in a fashion that seems like something from the times of the Roman Empire, simply laying waste to those they claimed needed protection.

I mean, they start a fire upstairs with grenades, then use tanks (or APC's, whatever) to rail holes into the building, followed with flamethrowers. No idea how much proof of that exists, but the fact that the series set out to make a grounded antihero out of a child marrying polygamist zealot who used religion to gain sexual access to women and live out a god complex is pretty gross.

I found a copy of the official FBI report on Waco at a garage sale years ago. Even taking it with the large grain of salt that the FBI probably left a bunch of shit out, the details are awful and damning all around.

There's a part where it describes one area of the house as having so many spent shell casings there were bodies completely buried beneath them. Forest was a monstrous sack of human garbage that had sex with children, and he should never ever be made sympathetic in any way.

You really don't need to do that in order to also understand that the feds completely botched the whole thing from top to bottom. Some fucking genius actually thought it was a good idea to play into the crazy religious fantasies while negotiating, and they claimed to actually have the “seven seals” or whatever biblical nonsense the Dravidians were rambling about.

No idea how much proof of that exists, but the fact that the series set out to make a grounded antihero out of a child marrying polygamist zealot who used religion to gain sexual access to women and live out a god complex is pretty gross. Ignoring that Forest was a cult leader nut, the ATF and US government should still take a majority share of the clusterfuck that was the actual siege.

Thought it was pretty good, but they didn't pay enough attention to Forest being a pedophile. Thought it was pretty good, but they didn't pay enough attention to Forest being a pedophile.

Considering how badly they botched everything, the government would have been better off just bringing in an AC-130 and just blasting the place to hell. If you are going to get everyone inside killed and then take no blame in it, may as well do it in style.

Considering how badly they botched everything, the government would have been better off just bringing in an AC-130 and just blasting the place to hell. If you are going to get everyone inside killed and then take no blame in it, may as well do it in style.

They apparently try to make her out as this House of Christian Machiavellian antihero badass, when in reality she was an emotionally shallow moron who appealed to other emotionally shallow morons and, by mere virtue of having a vagina, played some part in keeping feminists from monopolizing the conversation whether women deserved to be treated like human beings. We need to be satisfied with the fact that a lot of people are just pathetic, insecure, self-serving pieces of shit.

The apocalyptic nature of the whole ‘Seven Seals’ wasn’t really delved into, because that creates the murkiness of whether a mass suicide was the eventual goal or not. The Branch Dravidians absolutely believed that it was the end of the world, and independent research done by the University of Maryland showed there was plenty of time before the fires spread where everyone in the compound could have gotten out with minimal trouble.

Instead, they stayed inside, and executed at least twenty members, including children. As far as the fires being started by the pyrotechnic rounds, the show does a horrible job of portraying what actually happened.

Once again, it’s good for law enforcement to be held accountable when they make mistakes, and the series thoroughly covers the governments failures. 70 plus people not named David Forest died for no reason at the hands of an overzealous militarized government, there is no way around that.

At the time it happened the people in Waco said if they wanted to arrest David he drove into town once a week by himself. Luckily, Netflix has all the true crime documentaries we could ever need, so we won’t be forced to change our habits anytime soon.

With all the insanity that 2020 brought about, we are constantly at home watching whatever could possibly drown out the stresses in our daily lives. Since times have been pretty dark lately, some have decided to turn to more lighthearted documentaries like cooking, travel, and sports, but this list isn’t for them.

Perhaps we just want to feel better about how our lives are going, but for whatever reason, documentaries remain one of the most-streamed genres on Netflix to this day. With all the mediums available to consume true crime media (podcasts, books, shows, and movies), it has become nearly impossible to avoid, which is why we’ve compiled a list of our top picks for Netflix true crime documentaries just for you.

Arguably, this is one of the most influential true crime documentaries when it comes to the nation’s current obsession with the genre. This doc looks at the imprisonment, exoneration, re-arrest, and subsequent trial of Steven Avery, who was charged with (and convicted of) the murder of Teresa Halfback.

The Innocent Man is an adaptation of John Grisham’s only nonfiction book, which looks at the 1998 wrongful conviction of Ronald Keith Williamson for the rape and murder of Debra Sue Carter. Just as serial killers are viewed with an unsettling amount of interest in our country right now, so are cults.

Darkly tragic and gripping, we learn firsthand about their stories and why they decided to commit such capital crimes in the first place. The documentary looks at how Behold embedded himself in the Bro berg family and how he was able to abduct Jan both times.

Littered throughout the documentary are also aliens, Mormonism, and a whole heap of “how the f×ck can you let someone do that to your daughter twice, you ignorant fools?” Perhaps one of the most infamous serial killers in American history, Ted Bundy went on a rampage that spanned multiple states, years, and victims.

This documentary brings recordings of him to the front and center, allowing audiences a look at just how psychotic and terrible he was. While some have argued this glorifies serial killers, thereby expressing everything that is wrong with the country’s obsession with crimes, it is an interesting look at the mind of a notorious criminal.

Evil Genius looks at the murder of Brian Wells, which was part of what might be one of the most insane bank heist stories ever told. After being twice convicted for the murder of her roommate Meredith Teacher while living in Italy, Amanda Knox spent four years in an Italian jail before being acquitted.

Other Articles You Might Be Interested In

01: Vlak Do Vidne Z Prahy
02: Vlak Do Viedne Z Bratislavy
03: Qfazenda Do Zenon
04: Sobrinha Do Sherlock Holmes
05: Socolor 5vr
06: Someone Is Watch Over Me
07: Someone To Watch Over Me
08: Someone To Watch Over Me Accompaniment
09: Someone To Watch Over Me Accompaniment Track
10: Someone To Watch Over Me Ace Atkins
Sources
1 www.goodreads.com - https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/52007525-someone-to-watch-over-me