logo
Archive

Are Walker Mufflers Any Good

author
Christina Perez
• Thursday, 31 December, 2020
• 10 min read

In our previous post, we decided to try out an inexpensive alternative to replacing our OEM muffler. Walker Exhaust manufactures OEM replacement mufflers for all makes and models.

muffler walker 2wd comparisons 4wd catalog
(Source: www.toyotavantech.com)

Contents

Not the greatest, but it looks like it will withstand year round outdoor weather. We actually bought the Walker Spring Bolt Kit just in case, but we're happy to report that we were able to fully utilize all of our OEM hardware including the original hangers. Although installation was easy, fitment was another story.

Obviously you can mask this with a set of chrome finisher tips but still... While this isn't a “restoration quality” piece of hardware, we wouldn't hesitate to recommend the Walker Quiet Flow SS line of mufflers to anyone that just needs an inexpensive replacement to their old rusted-off can.

It's also incredibly quiet and doesn't have any annoying drones or hums that you usually find at your local franchise muffler shops. That being said, we're still on the lookout for a pre-COVID 88-91 Honda CRY Si OEM muffler.

The Quiet-Flow SS has a lifetime warranty and is stainless steel and the Sound FX has a 1-year warranty and is aluminized which I have no idea what they mean by this. My '06 Ram has 159K miles and has the original exhaust (OEM stainless steel).

We've got a 94 Caravan with 185K on the original muffler and pipes. We do have a mild climate and haven't run many short trips on it until the last 4-5 years.

(Source: thesassytiara.wordpress.com)

Aluminized means it has a coating on it to prevent the steel from rusting. The outer casing cracked along the weld line at some point during the winter and let road salt get inside, which rotted out the interior, which looked like mild steel.

Pickering and Doug D, Yeah I hate doing muffler work over and over again. I put a Walker steel muffler about 3-4 years ago, and it is now sounding loud when accelerating.

The last time I check under that area it looks like it is starting to fail as it's rusting and the weep hole shows quite a bit of it. I'm thinking of stainless steel because in the long run I'll probably save more money doing the job once instead of every 3 to 4 years.

Aluminized means it has a coating on it to prevent the steel from rusting. The outer casing cracked along the weld line at some point during the winter and let road salt get inside, which rotted out the interior, which looked like mild steel.

Any exhaust system will rust eventually, regardless of the manufacturer. The muffler on my 9+ year old 1999 DEC is starting to fail.

sste mufflers 27x39 walker sign screen ra0715
(Source: www.mecum.com)

I see that Walker makes a muffler 21275+36234 and resonator pipe 55049 that I can buy at NAPA or other places. It works pretty good and beats paying an arm and a leg from the dealer.

I have no idea what comes OEM on the third generation vans, but OEM muffler in my '96 Town & Country finally went south just a few months ago. When I dragged the resulting clanging, blaring, van to the dealer I found myself complaining.

I can almost guarantee you'll find a buyer here who would be more than willing to scoop it up off your hands. Easy to install, I do not like the walker muffler retainer though, very poorly made.

I Work at a NAPA auto parts in NJ and I can tell you the Walker mufflers have a lifetime warranty on them, but the pipes do not...the 21275 muffler sells for $92.98+tax and the 36234 hanger goes for $27.89+tax, and the 55049 goes for 71.89 +tax...of course, that's just our prices, as all NAPA stores are independently owned and prices may vary Hi, folks! Thought I'd share my recent experiences with aftermarket Walker exhaust parts on my 1995 SC2.

Couple years ago I went to lower it by undoing the strap (to shore up the heat shields), ended up twisting the strap (my bad) and poked a hole in the muffler in the process. I bet I haven't driven 5000 miles since then, and already it's sounding like a damn rice burner.

pt cruiser
(Source: www.ptcruiserlinks.com)

Granted, it sits on a gravel/dirt driveway most of the time, but it shouldn't sound that bad in two years. In your case, an SS muffler should last a LOT longer. 'Course, there are different grades of stainless, determined by how much chromium is in the mix.

The mechanic showed some small pepper holes at that point. I have again replaced the exhaust from the cat back, with Walker parts.

The Quiet Flow muffler was shipped out yesterday to Rock Auto for warranty. As I put together the exhaust system loosely (didn't tighten down the clamps), I started up the car, and in about a minute, a stream of water came down from where the intermediate pipe meets the muffler.

So, that's a condensate collection point if you do a lot of quick, short trips, and I can't really blame the Walker part for rusting. ON the plus side, I have not had any problems with Walker parts fit, unlike other brands.

Interesting info, Baron. I can fairly blame Walker for selling me a stainless steel muffler that's coming apart at the seams after a year and a half. Glad it's got a lifetime warranty but seriously this looks like they took an aluminized muffler and repackaged it as SS.

exhaust runner road cars larger headers
(Source: www.nicksgarage.com)

...1995 SC2 Plum 4-Disc 5SPD $1495 2.17.10 (111K to present) 1993 SC2 Silver 4-Disc Auto $1500 8.2007 to 2.2010 (195K-ish BY R.I.P. I can fairly blame Walker for selling me a stainless steel muffler that's coming apart at the seams after a year and a half.

Glad it's got a lifetime warranty but seriously this looks like they took an aluminized muffler and repackaged it as SS. I don't recall seeing an SS option in the online catalog when I went to order in the replacement parts last month, but SS may be a special order that they list somewhere else. I don't know what you paid for that, but yes, I would be ticked if I went to the expense of putting that in, and having it fail so quickly, lifetime warranty or not.

I wonder if drilling small drain holes at key points would help the internal rotting issue. The original muffler has a drain hole. My Walker cat looks poorly aluminized, and the welds look like they will begin to rust immediately, though it does get quite hot, so it may last awhile.

The original exhaust parts must have very low oxygen content, because even after the aluminum layer wears through, they don't corrode very quickly. I really liked the construction of the Magnaflow cat I bought 3 times for my Saturn.

Probably not stainless, but it didn't look like it was going to start rusting immediately. Unfortunately none of the Magnaflow cats I bought fit my car due to improper welding.

installs flowmaster flowfx buddy sent member he
(Source: www.gmsquarebody.com)

Has a lifetime warranty, so I just tighten the clamps tight enough to hold everything together, and then when it goes, I reuse the pipes on a new muffler. I have considered drilling drain holes at the rust points, as there is no way for the water to escape otherwise.

It will oxidize to a brown color and slowly rot from the inside out. I wonder if drilling small drain holes at key points would help the internal rotting issue.

The internal rot occurred at the end of the intermediate pipe. Drilling holes there would allow noise and fail state inspection.

On my current install, I sprayed the inside of the pipe end with High-temp (BBQ) paint. I wish I had a picture handy as I'd challenge anyone to guess the age.

Here's Walker's press release from 2008, announcing the upgrade of the Quiet flow mufflers to 'OE grade stainless steel' : ...1995 SC2 Plum 4-Disc 5SPD $1495 2.17.10 (111K to present) 1993 SC2 Silver 4-Disc Auto $1500 8.2007 to 2.2010 (195K-ish BY R.I.P.

reading spur
(Source: www.spur.org)

I used to deliver parts for an auto warehouse to local shops, and they went through LOT of walker exhaust products. The model number of the one I have : 21348, ordered from Rock Auto in April 2010.

OK, that is the one I purchased in April 2008, and just replaced under warranty. Per Walker, today: “In regard to the 21348 muffler, it is made of T409 stainless steel.” I really can't complain, because I purchased that item for about $20-$25 after rebate, and just replaced it under warranty for the price of return shipping of the failed unit ($10).

OK, that is the one I purchased in April 2008, and just replaced under warranty. Per Walker, today: “In regard to the 21348 muffler, it is made of T409 stainless steel.” I really can't complain, because I purchased that item for about $20-$25 after rebate, and just replaced it under warranty for the price of return shipping of the failed unit ($10).

Mufflers that are back by the rear bumper do not last long as mufflers mounted closer to the engine due to the condensation of the corrosive gases. Mufflers that are back by the rear bumper do not last long as mufflers mounted closer to the engine due to the condensation of the corrosive gases.

My understanding is that this becomes less of an issue for cars that are driven long enough to warm completely up when they are used. Complete warm up does minimize the problem, but it takes a good period of time in the summer and much longer in the winter.

streetrodding 1932 coupe ford window radial tires
(Source: www.streetrodding.com)

This is why you find the CAT and muffler as close to the engine as will fit. Small transverse mounted engine cars pose a problem in this regard.

10-17-2011, 08:02 PM # 17 Location: Madison, WI USA Complete warm up does minimize the problem, but it takes a good period of time in the summer and much longer in the winter.

This is why you find the CAT and muffler as close to the engine as will fit. Small transverse mounted engine cars pose a problem in this regard.

My OFNI, VW 1.7 engine, had the exhaust in the rear; super-short manifold, simple flex-gasket on the manifold-downpipe joint to address engine movement, short straight pipe back. Much simpler from a “real estate” perspective; no exhaust pipe running under the oil pan, etc.

My OFNI, VW 1.7 engine, had the exhaust in the rear; super-short manifold, simple flex-gasket on the manifold-downpipe joint to address engine movement, short straight pipe back. Much simpler from a “real estate” perspective; no exhaust pipe running under the oil pan, etc.

streetrodding 1932 coupe ford window radial tires
(Source: www.streetrodding.com)

I wasn't even around... but saw a nice 1 last yr neat nifty car The head pipe was attached to the exhaust manifold with 2 large evil “C” shaped springs that required a special Teutonic tool to either remove or replace.

The head pipe was attached to the exhaust manifold with 2 large evil “C” shaped springs that required a special Teutonic tool to either remove or replace. I've seen a few Rabbit diesels from back in the day (my father-in-law had one); pretty sure the main block was the same one used in the passers, including the engines sent here for the early Omanis/Horizons.

Other Articles You Might Be Interested In

01: Bdo Is Warrior Good 2019
02: Example For Wallflower
03: Example For Z Test
04: Excel For Z Score
05: Exmoor Zoo Walk On The Wild Side
06: Exodia From Yu-gi-oh
07: Explanation For Wandavision
08: Zegapain 01 Vostfr
09: Zegapain Adaptation
10: Zegapain Altair
Sources
1 www.hlj.com - https://www.hlj.com/1-72-scale-zegapain-altair-ban945072
2 anidb.net - https://anidb.net/character/18832
3 en.wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Zegapain_characters