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Are Wakes Allowed In Illinois

author
Maria Johnson
• Tuesday, 19 January, 2021
• 11 min read

There is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Persons who have COVID-19 or are exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 should be restricted from attending the funeral service or visitation to prevent its spread to others.

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(Source: www.chicagotribune.com)

Contents

Decedents with COVID-19 can be buried or cremated but check for any additional state or local requirements that may dictate the handling and disposition of the remains of individuals who have died of certain infectious diseases. Decedents with COVID-19 can be buried or cremated but check for any additional state or local requirements that may dictate the handling and disposition of the remains of individuals who have died of certain infectious diseases.

Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Following social distancing recommendations and proper handwashing will help prevent the spread of the disease.

There may be less of a chance of the virus spreading from certain types of touching, such as holding the hand or hugging after the body has been prepared for viewing. If splashing of fluids is expected, additional personal protective equipment (PPE) may be required (such as disposable gown, face shield or goggles and facemask).

Funeral home workers should follow routine infection prevention and control precautions when handling a decedent who died of COVID-19. If it is necessary to transfer a body to a bag, follow standard precautions, including additional PPE if splashing of fluids is expected.

Follow the manufacturer's instructions for cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time). During embalming, follow standard precautions including the use of additional PPE if splashing is expected (e.g., disposable gown, face shield or goggles and facemask).

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(Source: air-out-there.blogspot.com)

Wear appropriate respiratory protection if any procedures will generate aerosols or if required for chemicals used in accordance with the manufacturer's label. Additional information on how to safely conduct aerosol- generating procedures is in the CDC's Postmortem Guidance.

Follow the manufacturer's instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time). The grieving woman was several feet from Brooke Benjamin, as health officials recommend in these days of coronavirus.

Cook County clerk’s office Funeral homes are removing shared pens and urging visitors not to use computerized sign-in screens. Funeral director Tony LPO has been signing in guests himself at Cumberland Chapels, 8300 W. Lawrence Ave., Porridge.

If more than 10 people show up at wakes, they’ll probably be urged to wait in the lobby to space themselves out, LPO said: “It’s almost like going to a bar, and they’re at capacity, and it’s one in, one out.” Because of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, “I have been telling people no wakes, ” said Rebecca Bishop of Carib Funeral Home, 3314 W. Armitage Ave. “Maybe the immediate family can view the body for a short time.

The family of 99-year-old Malachi Today, a renowned traditional Irish musician from the South Side, postponed services after his death March 11. But given that he left behind six children, 12 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and a vast network of friends and musicians, delaying the funeral seemed best for all, said his daughter Julia Sweeney.

Provided When former Sun-Times religion editor Roy Larson, 90, died Feb. 25 at Monarch Landing in Naperville, his family planned to have a memorial there. Adding to the family’s grief: No visits are allowed with their mother Dorothy, who also lives at the nursing home.

“She’s alone and is having trouble processing this,” Mark Larson said, “She calls my sister a lot and asks, ‘Where’s Roy?’ She’s there, and we can’t get to her.” Some death notices are starting to contain the line, “Due to the pandemic and out of concern for our extended family and friends services and Shiva will be private.” Funeral director Mindy Bottom crafted that wording with families at Shalom Memorial Funeral Home in Arlington Heights.

The irony, Bottom said, is that “the Jewish community takes comfort in communal ways. One aspect of Shiva includes the community joining together to help a mourner get through the first days of grief.

MATT: GOLDEN GATE FUNERAL SERVICE OWNER DIAMOND PIGGIES HAS HAD TO TELL CLIENTS IN THEIR WORST POSSIBLE MOMENT THEY CAN’T GATHER TO SAY GOODBYE TO THE ONE THEY LOVE. MATT: IN KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI, DURING THE MAYOR’S STAY AT HOME ORDER, NO ONE CAN HAVE A FUNERAL GATHERING, UNLESS THEY PETITION THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT.

Funeral directors in the Kansas City area are having excruciatingly tough conversations with people during the coronavirus pandemic because funeral gatherings are not allowed under most stay-at-home orders. “Any type of gathering or viewing, we cannot do,” said Diamond Piggies, owner of Golden Gate Funeral and Cremation Services.

“Piggies aid he had to cancel a funeral Tuesday due to the mayor’s new stay-at-home order. Direct funerals and cremations remain in place, but Golden Gate’s staff is operating on a limited basis, canceling all limousine service for families, and trying to make sure funerals still on the schedule are aware of the city’s new requirements.

Piggies aid he’s trying to offer as much comfort to families who mostly understand the order. In Kansas City, the only way people can gather at a funeral during the mayor’s stay-at-home order is by petitioning the Kansas City Health Department by calling 311 for special approval, according to Morgan Said, spokeswoman for Mayor Quinton Lucas. The Health Department would have to make sure both the funeral home and family members are aware of social distancing requirements and approval would be done on a case-by-case basis, she said. Still, new regulations and orders have become confusing for funeral directors and the public, due to varying laws in different municipalities. “People are having to look to alternatives, like having a small service right now, that’s permitted in your jurisdiction, planning a memorial service later after the virus crisis passes,” said Don Otto Jr., executive director of the Missouri Funeral Directors and Embalmers Association. The association has put out weekly guidance to its members to make sure everyone is informed.

“Any type of gathering or viewing, we cannot do,” said Diamond Piggies, owner of Golden Gate Funeral and Cremation Services. Piggies aid he had to cancel a funeral Tuesday due to the mayor’s new stay-at-home order.

Direct funerals and cremations remain in place, but Golden Gate’s staff is operating on a limited basis, canceling all limousine service for families, and trying to make sure funerals still on the schedule are aware of the city’s new requirements. In Kansas City, the only way people can gather at a funeral during the mayor’s stay-at-home order is by petitioning the Kansas City Health Department by calling 311 for special approval, according to Morgan Said, spokeswoman for Mayor Quinton Lucas.

The Health Department would have to make sure both the funeral home and family members are aware of social distancing requirements and approval would be done on a case-by-case basis, she said. Still, new regulations and orders have become confusing for funeral directors and the public, due to varying laws in different municipalities.

“People are having to look to alternatives, like having a small service right now, that’s permitted in your jurisdiction, planning a memorial service later after the virus crisis passes,” said Don Otto Jr., executive director of the Missouri Funeral Directors and Embalmers Association. The association has put out weekly guidance to its members to make sure everyone is informed.

“And the times are not being published for the public because we are working under (U.S. Centers for Disease Control) recommendations to limit gatherings to 10 people or fewer.” Employees always keep the funeral home clean, he said, but they’re now practicing “social distancing” in the office and using more disinfectant wipes on doorknobs and other hard surfaces.

Easily Mortuary in Fairview Heights and other metro-east funeral homes are limiting the number of mourners at services and taking extra steps to sanitize. Last week, officials across the country began closing restaurants, schools, museums, libraries and other public places due to coronavirus, a respiratory illness also known as COVID-19, which has been declared a pandemic.

One person watching closely is Greg Henderson, board president for the Illinois Funeral Directors Association, which has 1,300 members across the state. The board addressed the crisis on its Facebook page Tuesday, emphasizing the CDC recommendation that private and public gatherings be limited to 10 people.

By Thursday, that statement was being reworked because, Henderson said, the CDC is reporting that there is no known risk associated with being in the same room with the body of a person who has died of COVID-19, with or without embalming. The funeral home industry has always had to deal with viruses and diseases, ranging from tuberculosis to HIV/AIDS and hepatitis, Easily said.

His grandfather, John Easily Sr., opened the family’s first funeral home in East St. Louis in 1906, about 12 years before the 1918 influenza pandemic that killed 50 million people worldwide. While not health-related, a gravediggers’ strike occurred after Charlie Easily had joined the business, forcing funeral homes to delay burials for weeks.

Today, both Runner and Easily are allowing people to make funeral arrangements by phone or through digital technologies if they feel uncomfortable leaving their homes because of coronavirus. This photo from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control shows a victim of the 1918 influenza pandemic, which killed 50 million people worldwide, being carried on a stretcher.

“It is vitally important that members of the public continue to practice recommended preventative measures, such as social distancing and robust personal hygiene, as recommended by the CDC and St. Clair County Health Department,” it says. This old photo from the website of Easily Mortuary in Fairview Heights was taken when funeral homes also operated ambulance services.

“There may be less of a chance of the virus spreading from certain types of touching, such as holding the hand or hugging after the body has been prepared for viewing,” the website states. It doesn’t discourage embalming or holding funerals or visitations, but it suggests precautions in addition to what already is standard to prevent infection.

Individuals experiencing homelessness are exempt from this directive, but are strongly urged to obtain shelter, and governmental and other entities are strongly urged to make such shelter available as soon as possible and to the maximum extent practicable (and to use in their operation COVID-19 risk mitigation practices recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Illinois Department of Public Health (DPH)). For purposes of this Executive Order, homes or residences include hotels, motels, shared rental units, shelters, and similar facilities.

For clarity, businesses may also continue operations consisting exclusively of employees or contractors performing activities at their own residences (i.e., working from home). To the greatest extent feasible, Essential Businesses and Operations shall comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Executive Order, including by maintaining six-foot social distancing for both employees and members of the public at all times, including, but not limited to, when any customers are standing in line.

All public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring outside a single household or living unit are prohibited, except for the limited purposes permitted by this Executive Order. Pursuant to current guidance from the CDC, any gathering of more than ten people are prohibited unless exempted by this Executive Order.

All places of public amusement, whether indoors or outdoors, including but not limited to, locations with amusement rides, carnivals, amusement parks, water parks, aquariums, zoos, museums, arcades, fairs, children’s play centers, playgrounds, duplexes, theme parks, bowling alleys, movie and other theaters, concert and music halls, and country clubs or social clubs shall be closed to the public. People riding on public transit must comply with Social Distancing Requirements to the greatest extent feasible.

For purposes of this Executive Order, individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following Essential Activities: For health and safety. To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements, as defined below, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, running, or biking.

For purposes of this Executive Order, individuals may leave their residence to work for or obtain services through Healthcare and Public Health Operations. Healthcare and Public Health Operations includes, but is not limited to: hospitals; clinics; dental offices; pharmacies; public health entities, including those that compile, model, analyze and communicate public health information; pharmaceutical, pharmacy, medical device and equipment, and biotechnology companies (including operations, research and development, manufacture, and supply chain); organizations collecting blood, platelets, plasma, and other necessary materials; licensed medical cannabis dispensaries and licensed cannabis cultivation centers; reproductive health care providers; eye care centers, including those that sell glasses and contact lenses; home healthcare services providers; mental health and substance use providers; other healthcare facilities and suppliers and providers of any related and/or ancillary healthcare services; and entities that transport and dispose of medical materials and remains.

Specifically included in Healthcare and Public Health Operations are manufacturers, technicians, logistics, and warehouse operators and distributors of medical equipment, personal protective equipment (PPE), medical gases, pharmaceuticals, blood and blood products, vaccines, testing materials, laboratory supplies, cleaning, sanitizing, disinfecting or sterilization supplies, and tissue and paper towel products. Healthcare and Public Health Operations does not include fitness and exercise gyms, spas, salons, barber shops, tattoo parlors, and similar facilities.

Human Services Operations includes, but is not limited to: long-term care facilities; all entities licensed pursuant to the Child Care Act, 225 ILLS 10, except for day care centers, day care homes, group day care homes, and day care centers licensed as specified in Section 12(s) of this Executive Order; residential settings and shelters for adults, seniors, children, and/or people with developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, substance use disorders, and/or mental illness; transitional facilities; home-based settings to provide services to individuals with physical, intellectual, and/or developmental disabilities, seniors, adults, and children; field offices that provide and help to determine eligibility for basic needs including food, cash assistance, medical coverage, child care, vocational services, rehabilitation services; developmental centers; adoption agencies; businesses that provide food, shelter, and social services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged individuals, individuals with physical, intellectual, and/or developmental disabilities, or otherwise needy individuals. For purposes of this Executive Order, individuals may leave their residence to provide any services or perform any work necessary to offer, provision, operate, maintain and repair Essential Infrastructure.

Essential Infrastructure includes, but is not limited to: food production, distribution, and sale; construction (including, but not limited to, construction required in response to this public health emergency, hospital construction, construction of long-term care facilities, public works construction, and housing construction); building management and maintenance; airport operations; operation and maintenance of utilities, including water, sewer, and gas; electrical (including power generation, distribution, and production of raw materials); distribution centers; oil and biofuel refining; roads, highways, railroads, and public transportation; ports; cybersecurity operations; flood control; solid waste and recycling collection and removal; and internet, video, and telecommunications systems (including the provision of essential global, national, and local infrastructure for computing services, business infrastructure, communications, and web-based services). Nothing in this Executive Order shall prohibit any individual from performing or accessing Essential Governmental Functions.

Grocery stores, pharmacies, certified farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, convenience stores, and other establishments engaged in the retail sale of groceries, canned food, dry goods, frozen foods, fresh fruits and vegetables, pet supplies, fresh meats, fish, and poultry, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and any other household consumer products (such as cleaning and personal care products). Food and beverage manufacturing, production, processing, and cultivation, including farming, livestock, fishing, baking, and other production agriculture, including cultivation, marketing, production, and distribution of animals and goods for consumption; licensed medical and adult use cannabis dispensaries and licensed cannabis cultivation centers; and businesses that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for animals, including animal shelters, rescues, shelters, kennels, and adoption facilities; Organizations that provide charitable and social services.

Businesses and religious and secular nonprofit organizations, including food banks, when providing food, shelter, and social services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities; Media. Newspapers, television, radio, and other media services; Gas stations and businesses needed for transportation.

Banks, currency exchanges, consumer lenders, including but not limited, to payday lenders, pawnbrokers, consumer installment lenders and sales finance lenders, credit unions, appraisers, title companies, financial markets, trading and futures exchanges, affiliates of financial institutions, entities that issue bonds, related financial institutions, and institutions selling financial products; Hardware and supply stores. Hardware stores and businesses that sell electrical, plumbing, and heating material; Critical trades.

Building and Construction Tradesmen and Tradeswomen, and other trades including but not limited to plumbers, electricians, exterminators, cleaning and janitorial staff for commercial and governmental properties, security staff, operating engineers, HVAC, painting, moving and relocation services, and other service providers who provide services that are necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences, Essential Activities, and Essential Businesses and Operations; Mail, post, shipping, logistics, delivery, and pick-up services. Post offices and other businesses that provide shipping and delivery services, and businesses that ship or deliver groceries, food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, goods or services to end users or through commercial channels; Educational institutions.

Schools and other entities that provide food services under this exemption shall not permit the food to be eaten at the site where it is provided, or at any other gathering site due to the virus’s propensity to physically impact surfaces and personal property. Businesses that sell, manufacture, or supply other Essential Businesses and Operations with the support or materials necessary to operate, including computers, audio and video electronics, household appliances; IT and telecommunication equipment; hardware, paint, flat glass; electrical, plumbing and heating material; sanitary equipment; personal hygiene products; food, food additives, ingredients and components; medical and orthopedic equipment; optics and photography equipment; diagnostics, food and beverages, chemicals, soaps and detergent; and firearm and ammunition suppliers and retailers for purposes of safety and security; Transportation.

Airlines, taxis, transportation network providers (such as Uber and Lyft), vehicle rental services, para transit, and other private, public, and commercial transportation and logistics providers necessary for Essential Activities and other purposes expressly authorized in this Executive Order; Home-based care and services. Home-based care for adults, seniors, children, and/or people with developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, substance use disorders, and/or mental illness, including caregivers such as nannies who may travel to the child’s home to provide care, and other in-home services including meal delivery; Residential facilities and shelters.

Day care centers granted an emergency license pursuant to Title 89, Section 407.400 of the Illinois Administrative Code, governing Emergency Day Care Programs for children of employees exempted by this Executive Order to work as permitted. The licensing requirements for day care homes pursuant to Section 4 of the Child Care Act, 225 ILLS 10/4, are hereby suspended for family homes that receive up to 6 children for the duration of the Gubernatorial Disaster Proclamation.

For the purposes of this Executive Order, Minimum Basic Operations include the following, provided that employees comply with Social Distancing Requirements, to the extent possible, while carrying out such operations: The minimum necessary activities to maintain the value of the business’s inventory, preserve the condition of the business’s physical plant and equipment, ensure security, process payroll and employee benefits, or for related functions. The minimum necessary activities to facilitate employees of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their residences.

Individuals engaged in any Essential Travel must comply with all Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section. Travel required by law enforcement or court order, including to transport children pursuant to a custody agreement.

Individuals are strongly encouraged to verify that their transportation out of the State remains available and functional prior to commencing such travel. Implementing separate operating hours for elderly and vulnerable customers; and Online and remote access.

The intent of this Executive Order is to ensure that the maximum number of people self-isolate in their places of residence to the maximum extent feasible, while enabling essential services to continue, to slow the spread of COVID-19 to the greatest extent possible. When people need to leave their places of residence, whether to perform Essential Activities, or to otherwise facilitate authorized activities necessary for continuity of social and commercial life, they should at all times and as much as reasonably possible comply with Social Distancing Requirements.

Nothing in this Executive Order shall, in any way, alter or modify any existing legal authority allowing the State or any county, or local government body from ordering (1) any quarantine or isolation that may require an individual to remain inside a particular residential property or medical facility for a limited period of time, including the duration of this public health emergency, or (2) any closer of a specific location for a limited period of time, including the duration of this public health emergency. Pursuant to the Illinois Emergency Management Agency Act, 20 ILLS 3305/7(2), (8), and (10), all state, county, and local law enforcement officers in the State of Illinois are instructed to cease enforcement of orders of eviction for residential premises for the duration of the Gubernatorial Disaster Proclamation.

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Sources
1 www.mrguider.org - https://www.mrguider.org/guides/kiss-of-war-guide-tips-tricks-cheats-for-beginners/
2 www.facebook.com - https://www.facebook.com/kissofwaronline/posts/